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Using Research to Build Better Public Policy for Families
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Policy Institute for
Family Impact Seminars

UW-Madison/Extension
Nancy Nicholas Hall
1300 Linden Drive
Madison WI 53706
Phone: 608-263-2353
Fax: 608-265-6048
Frequently Asked Questions

What is family policy?

What is a family impact lens in policymaking?

Why do we need a family impact lens in policymaking?

What is a family impact analysis?

What are Family Impact Seminars?

What makes the Family Impact Seminars unique?

Do Family Impact Seminars work?

What do participants say about Family Impact Seminars?

When did the Seminars start?

Family Impact Seminars began as a series of two-hour briefings on Capitol Hill for staff of Congressional offices, federal agencies, and policy organizations. Between 1988 and 1998, Theodora Ooms and her staff conducted 42 seminars on a wide range of family policy issues. In 1999, the federal seminars were ended and attention was redirected to building a network of state Family Impact Seminar sites. At that time, California, Washington DC, and Wisconsin were the only sites conducting Family Impact Seminars. The long-standing mission of the Family Impact Seminar to build the capacity for family-centered policymaking was assumed by the newly-formed Policy Institute for Family Impact Seminars at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Since then, many new states have joined the Family Impact Seminar network.

Which states are conducting Family Impact Seminars?

What issues have been covered?

Who conducts the Seminars?

How can my organization apply to be a Family Impact Seminar state site?

If you have trouble accessing this page, require this information in an alternative format, or wish to request a reasonable accommodation because of a disability contact Jennifer Seubert at info@familyimpactseminars.org or 608-263-2353.

Wisconsin capitol photo courtesy of Jeff Miller, UW-Madison University Communications, 2002.